Policies and Regulations NEPN Code: IKA-R SFSD Logo

Instruction
Grading/Recovery System

Definitions
Make-up Work: Students have the opportunity to make up work missed due to absences. Students and parents/guardians have the responsibility to contact teachers and receive assignments. The guidelines for completing make-up work are included in the School Board Policy JH and Regulation JH-R (Student Absences/Excuses).

Recovery: Recovery is an administratively approved opportunity to have a second chance to demonstrate competency in a failed class. Recovery is available if a student can document a significant life experience that has had a negative impact on academic achievement. Recovery is also made available for students that maintain regular attendance and have completed all assignments but have failed a specific portion of the course work that causes an overall failure for the course. Requests for recovery must be submitted within two weeks following the completion of the course grading period to the building principal/designee. Students and parents/guardians will receive the assigned work from the school and the student is responsible for completing the assigned work within the time contracted with the designated principal.

Grading/Reporting

The following regulations are based on the School Board’s philosophy on grading (IKA). These procedures consider similarities among levels (elementary, middle school, and high school), as well as individual differences within each of the levels. Variations reflect the unique developmental needs of the students and program characteristics at each level.

Elementary Schools (PreK-5)

  1. Methods and Frequency of Reporting
    1. Teachers continually conduct ongoing evaluation of learning and use varied ways to assess progress, both formal and informal. Methods chosen must be appropriate for the developmental level of students in the primary or intermediate grades and accurately measure the learning of standards in the curriculum. Determination of grades is based on assignments, quizzes, tests, performance activities, and portfolios.
    2. Elementary teachers report to students and parents/guardians frequently, using a variety of methods to provide information regarding student progress. Formal report cards are distributed at the conclusion of each of the four reporting periods.
    3. Conferences are scheduled as needed to discuss progress with parents/guardians, including two required conferences. Required conferences are held following the end of the first quarter and in the middle of the third quarter. Students-led conferences are an option if desired by building staff.
    4. Parents/guardians must be contacted by the school when a student is performing below grade level and has received a majority of 1s (Below Proficient) on grade level standards or is experiencing a significant decline in achievement.
    5. No grade is required on a report card if the student has been enrolled in the classroom less than 15 school days in the grading period.
    6. Art, music, physical education, band, and orchestra grades are distributed quarterly on the classroom report card. Additional checklists for band, chorus, and orchestra may be shared at the designated conference times.
  2. Reporting Instruments
    1. Early Childhood
      The Early Childhood Programs use a nongraded and ongoing developmental assessment. Upon entry into Early Childhood Programs, an entrance profile of current developmental skills is obtained. While enrolled in the program, children’s development is monitored through an ongoing assessment and reported to parents/guardians through conferences and updates on individual goals. In addition, home visits are completed twice per year to provide activities and information to parents/guardians. At the time a child exits the Early Childhood Programs, an exit profile of the child’s developmental skills is completed.
    2. Kindergarten, Grades 1 through 5
      Students in Kindergarten through grade five receive an end-of-quarter report card. Teachers mark the standards that are emphasized each quarter. Information regarding a student’s learning behavior is reported separately from the grade on the learning standards.
      Code Explanations
      4 = Proficient with Distinction
      The student goes beyond the grade level performance indicators for this quarter by making inferences and by applying the information in new ways that were not explicitly taught.
      3 = Proficient
      The student meets the grade level performance indicators for this quarter. The student is “on track” for attaining mastery of end-of-year learner objectives.
      2 = Approaching Proficiency
      The student is working towards grade level performance indicators for this quarter and is approaching grade level learner objectives for this quarter.
      1 = Below Proficient
      The student falls below the grade level performance indicators for this quarter.
    3. Elementary Report Card Guide
      An elementary report card guide is available through the elementary school or may be viewed and/or downloaded from the Sioux Falls School District’s website.
  3. Alternative Curriculum Reporting
    1. District Curriculum with Accommodations
      For the student who participates in the standard District curriculum content, the District will follow standard grading procedures with no reduction in grade because of adaptations that are used on a regular basis. Examples might include: tests read orally, using a tape recorder to respond to test questions, adjusting the timeframe for testing, using a computer to complete test responses, using taped textbooks, providing a study guide, accessing paraprofessional assistance or using written versus oral instructions. The qualifying indicator of “M” indicates that the grades issued reflect accommodations.
    2. Alternative Curriculum:
      Students who are unable to benefit from standard course curriculum content because of learning deficits may be considered for altered curriculum requirements in regular classes. The need for alternate course requirements must be approved by an Individual Education Plan Committee or Student Assistance Team and approved by the parents/guardians. Grading options include Pass/Fail or letter grades with a “K” code indicating alternative curriculum.
  4. Provisions for Recovery of Grades
    In the event that a student is failing a subject area, opportunities for recovery must be made available. Students must have opportunities to complete assigned work which has not been achieved or demonstrated during the initial presentation or assessment, within a reasonable time, as determined by the teacher. Work will receive full credit.
  5. Grading/Credit--including Coursework for Students Assigned to In-School Suspension and Out-of-School Suspension
    1. In-school suspension (ISS) the length of the regular school day.
      School personnel will provide supervision of the students in ISS. All completed assignments will receive full credit.
    2. Out-of-School Suspension with Opportunity for Credit (OSS - Alternate Site).
      An alternative out-of-school suspension placement is available for elementary students. Parents/guardians are responsible for providing transportation. Assignments are sent with the student and work is to be completed. All work will receive full credit at the student’s home school provided they attend the OSS alternative school during the suspended days in the entirety of the suspension.
    3. Out-of-School Suspension with Opportunity for Credit (At Home).
      Students may receive out-of-school suspension (OSS) for misbehavior outlined in the rules of student conduct and discipline for the elementary level. Students will have the opportunity for credit for any class one, two, three, or four (first or second time) offense. See the elementary school rules of student conduct and discipline.
    4. Out-of-School Suspension Without Opportunity for Credit.
      Students who receive a class four (third time offense) class five or class six offense will receive out-of-school suspension and will not be allowed to make-up work for credit. However, if a student and parent/guardian meet the stipulations outlined in the Superintendent’s or designee’s long-term suspension letter, the student will be allowed to receive full credit.

Middle Schools (6-8)

  1. Methods and Frequency of Reporting
    1. Teachers continually conduct ongoing evaluation of learning and use various means to assess progress, both formal and informal. Determination of grades is based on assignments, quizzes, tests, performance activities, and portfolios.
    2. Middle School teachers and teams report to parents/guardians frequently, using a variety of methods, to provide information regarding their children’s progress. Parents/guardians must be contacted by the school when a student is failing or is experiencing a significant decline in achievement. Formal report cards are distributed at midterm and at the conclusion of each quarter.
    3. Conferences with a specific teacher or the teams are scheduled as needed to discuss progress with parents/guardians, including two required conferences. Required conferences are held following the end of the first quarter and in the middle of the third quarter. Student-led and scheduled team conferences are options.
  2. Additional Student Evaluation
    Teachers are encouraged to provide parents/guardians with additional feedback in the comments section on a report card.
  3. Alternative Curriculum Reporting
    1. District Curriculum with Accommodations: For the student who participates in the standard District curriculum content, the District will follow standard grading procedures with no reduction in grade because of adaptations that are used on a regular basis. Examples might include: tests read orally, using a tape recorder to respond to test questions, adjusting the timeframe for testing, using a computer to complete test responses, using taped textbooks, providing a study guide, accessing paraprofessional assistance or using written versus oral instructions. The qualifying indicator of “M” indicates that the grades issued reflect accommodations.
    2. Alternative Curriculum: Students who are unable to benefit from standard course curriculum content because of learning deficits may be considered for altered curriculum requirements in regular classes. The need for alternate course requirements must be approved by an Individual Education Plan Committee or Student Assistance Team and approved by the parents/guardians. Grading options include Pass/Fail or letter grades with a “K” code indicating alternative curriculum.
  4. Reporting Instructions
    Students in grades six, seven, and eight receive an end-of-quarter progress report. Teachers use the following symbols for each subject area:

    Report Cards Numerical Scale For Report Cards
    A= Excellent 93 - 100
    B= Above Average 85 - 92
    C= Average 76 - 84
    D= Below Average 65 - 75
    F= Failing 64 and below

    Grades and percents will be rounded up or down with .5 as the rounding factor (example: 92.5 and above will be rounded to 93 and 92.499 will be rounded to 92).
    For the student who participates in the standard curriculum with accommodations, the qualifying indicator of “M” may be used. Examples might include: tests read orally, using a tape recorder to respond to test questions, adjusting the timeframe for testing, using a computer to complete test responses, using taped textbooks, providing a study guide, accessing paraprofessional assistance or using written versus oral instructions. Principal or IEP Committee approval is required before the “M” indicator may be used by a classroom teacher.
  5. Absences/Make-up Work
    Students who are absent are responsible for getting assignments for the days missed. All completed make-up work will receive full credit. No penalty points will be deducted from a student’s grade for placement in an alternative site. Students who attend any of those programs will have the opportunity to complete all class assignments and will not be assigned extra work for not being in class.
  6. Provisions for Recovery of Grades
    Recovery is an administratively approved opportunity to have a second chance to demonstrate competency in a failed class. Recovery is available if a student can document a significant life experience that has had a negative impact on academic achievement. Recovery is also made available for students that maintain regular attendance and have completed all assignments but have failed a specific portion of the course work that causes an overall failure for the course. Requests for recovery must be submitted within two weeks following the completion of the quarter to the building principal/designee. Students and parents/guardians will receive the assigned work from the school and the student is responsible for completing the assigned work within the time contracted with the designated principal.
    Although recovery does not guarantee that the student will pass the class, it provides him/her the opportunity to do so. Choice of whether or not to take advantage of this opportunity is the responsibility of the student and parent/guardian.
  7. Grading/Credit--including Coursework for Students Assigned to In-School Suspension and Out-of-School Suspension
    1. In-School Suspension/Out-of-School Suspension (Alternate Site).
      All completed teacher assigned work will receive full credit.
    2. Out-of-School Suspension with Opportunity for Credit.
      Students may receive out-of-school suspension (OSS) for misbehavior outlined in the rules of student conduct and discipline. Students will have the opportunity for credit for assignments and time missed during the days they are on out-of-school suspension for any class one, two, or three offenses provided they attend the OSS alternative school during the suspended days in the entirety of the suspension. The same applies with any class four (first or second time) offense. (See the middle school rules of student conduct and discipline.)
      1. The recovery sessions will be supervised by school personnel.
      2. All completed work will receive full credit.
    3. Out-of-School Suspension without Opportunity for Credit.
      Students who receive a class four (third time offense and thereafter), class five or class six offense will receive out-of-school suspension and will not be allowed to make-up work for credit. However, if a student and parent/guardian meet the stipulations outlined in the Superintendent’s or designee’s long-term suspension letter, the student will be allowed to receive full credit.
  8. Recognition of Grades and Achievement
    1. It is the practice of the District to recognize student achievement by posting honor rolls. Recognition or honor programs are encouraged practices.
    2. Open arena style conferences are acceptable at the middle school and high school level if the area can be arranged so as to provide a private conference for parents/guardians and students.
    3. Computerized quarterly grade sheets will be provided for students and parents/guardians. No open grade books that display other students’ grades will be shared.

High Schools (9-12)

  1. Methods and Frequency of Reporting
    1. Teachers continually conduct ongoing evaluation of learning and use various means to assess progress, both formal and informal. Determination of grades is based on class participation, assignments, quizzes, tests, performance activities, portfolio, and effort.
    2. High school teachers report to parents/guardians frequently, using a variety of methods, to provide information regarding their children’s progress. Parents/guardians are invited to contact the school counselor if additional information is required.
    3. Parent/teacher conferences are held the first quarter and third quarter in each school. Additional conferences with a specific teacher may be scheduled as needed to discuss a student’s progress with parents/guardians.
    4. Parents/guardians will be contacted by the school when a student is failing.
    5. Semester tests are given to all high school students. A semester test grade will count for 15% of a student’s final course grade. Students enrolled in an Advanced Placement (AP) course and taking the AP exam are not required to take a second semester test for that course. The student’s score on the AP exam will not affect the final course grade. Students not taking the AP exam will take a semester test for that AP course accounting for 15% of the student’s final grade. Students who have a scheduling conflict between a semester test and an AP exam will be given an alternative testing time for the semester test.
  2. Additional Student Evaluation
    Teachers are encouraged to provide parents/guardians with additional feedback in the comments section on a report card.
  3. Alternative Curriculum Reporting
    1. District Curriculum with Accommodations: For the student who participates in the standard District curriculum content, the District will follow standard grading procedures with no reduction in grade because of adaptations that are used on a regular basis. Examples might include: tests read orally, using a tape recorder to respond to test questions, adjusting the timeframe for testing, using a computer to complete test responses, using taped textbooks, providing a study guide, accessing paraprofessional assistance or using written versus oral instructions. The qualifying indicator of “M” indicates that the grades issued reflect accommodations.
    2. Alternative Curriculum: Students who are unable to benefit from standard course curriculum content because of learning deficits may be considered for altered curriculum requirements in regular classes. The need for alternate course requirements must be approved by an Individual Education Plan Committee or Student Assistance Team and approved by the parents/guardians. Grading options include Pass/Fail or letter grades with a “K” code indicating alternative curriculum.
  4. Reporting Instruments
    Students in grades nine, ten, eleven, and twelve receive an end of quarter report card posted on line. Paper copies are available upon request. Teachers use the following symbols for each subject area:

    Report Cards Numerical Scale For Report Cards
    A= Excellent 93 - 100
    B= Above Average 85 - 92
    C= Average 76 - 84
    D= Below Average 65 - 75
    F= Failing 64 and below

    Grades and percents will be rounded up or down with .5 as the rounding factor (example: 92.5 and above will be rounded to 93 and 92.499 will be rounded to 92).
    For the student who participates in the standard curriculum with accommodations, the qualifying indicator of “M” may be used. Examples might include: tests read orally, using a tape recorder to respond to test questions, adjusting the time frame for testing, using a computer to complete test responses, using taped textbooks, providing a study guide, accessing paraprofessional assistance or using written versus oral instructions. Principal or IEP Committee approval is required before the “M” indicator may be used by a classroom teacher.
  5. Absences/Make-up Work
    1. Students who are absent are responsible for getting assignments for the days missed. All completed make-up work will receive full credit based upon the criteria as specified in Policy JH/ JH-R. No penalty points will be deducted from a student’s grade for placement in an alternative site. Students who attend any of those programs will have the opportunity to complete all class assignments and will not be assigned extra work for not being in class.
    2. Students have the opportunity to make up work missed due to absence, with the exception of skipping, as specified in Policy JH/JH-R. If a student receives an incomplete as a final grade, the student will be given two weeks to complete the work before the final grade reverts to an “F.”
    3. Students with extended health absences who are not able to complete the course of study because of the illness may be dropped from the course as determined by either an IEP or 504 Team, and the course will not be listed on the transcript. Where homebound instruction can be provided, as specified in Policy JLCG/JLCG-R, in order to help a student with a long-term illness complete the coursework, the student will be graded as if the student participated in the course.
  6. Provisions for Recovery of Grades
    Recovery is an administratively approved opportunity to have a second chance to demonstrate competency in a failed class. Recovery is available if a student:
      • can document a significant life experience that has had a negative impact on academic achievement; or
      • maintains regular attendance and has completed all assignments but has failed a specific portion of the course work that causes an overall failure for the course; or
      • demonstrates acquisition of course content by achieving a score of 85% on an approved semester test but fails to complete assigned tasks or maintain regular attendance. The student will be awarded credit or a grade of D for passing the course. Excluded from this recovery option are participation and project-oriented classes (e.g. career and technical education, speech, debate, physical education, etc.).

    All requests for recovery must be submitted to the principal/designee in writing with a parent/guardian signature within two weeks following the completion of the semester. Upon receipt of the request, the principal/designee will meet with the student and parents/guardians to determine if the provisions for recovery have been met. If recovery is available, the student will be assigned a principal/designee to establish the recovery requirements.
    Although recovery does not guarantee that the student will pass the class, it provides him/her the opportunity to do so. Choice of whether or not to take advantage of this opportunity is the responsibility of the student and parent/guardian.
  7. Grading/Credit--including Coursework for Students Assigned to In-School Suspension and Out-of-School Suspension
    1. In-School Suspension/Out-of-School Suspension (Alternate Site).
      All completed teacher assigned work will receive full credit.
    2. Out-of-School Suspension With Opportunity for Credit.
      Students who receive out-of-school suspension (OSS) will have the opportunity to receive credit for assignments and time missed during the days they are serving out-of-school suspension for any class one, two, or three offenses provided they attend the OSS alternative school during the suspended days in the entirety of the suspension. The same applies with any class four (first or second time) offense. (See the high school rules of student conduct and discipline.)
    3. Out-of-School Suspension without Opportunity for Credit.
      Students who receive a class four (third time offense and thereafter), class five or class six offense will receive out-of-school suspension and will not be allowed to make-up work for credit. However, if a student and parent/guardian meet the stipulations outlined in the Superintendent’s or designee’s long-term suspension letter, the student will be allowed to receive full credit.
  8. Students Dropping a Course
    Students must submit a written request signed by a parent/guardian and obtain administrator approval to drop a course. In making the decision the administrator shall at a minimum consider the following factors:
    1. appropriate placement with regards to academic abilities and designated course selection option;
    2. class availability of desired replacement course (full sections/schedule conflicts); and
    3. the degree to which the request is arbitrary and capricious.

    Students who drop a course after the first five school days of a semester will receive an “F” grade, which will appear on their transcript and be figured in their grade point average. However, changes to a course of a lower or higher difficulty in the same subject area may occur with approval of the administrator and the teacher after the first five days without receiving an “F” grade.
  9. Recognition of Grades and Achievement
    1. It is the practice of the District to recognize student achievement by posting honor rolls. Recognition or honor programs are encouraged practices.
    2. Open arena style conferences are acceptable at the middle school and high school level if the area can be arranged so as to provide a private conference for parents/guardians and students.

Grading and Privacy Guidelines
The District believes that student privacy should be protected as grades are established, recorded, reviewed and returned. The following guidelines outline classroom and school procedures.

Assessing and Grading

Do's Don'ts
Students may correct their own assignments or tests in class. Students may not correct another student’s assignments or tests.
Students may rate a speech, written document or group presentation provided it does not influence the grade (rubric rating and/or written comments). Students may not assign a grade to a speech, written document or group presentation.
Students may receive an individual and group or team grade for a collaborative project.  
Students’ graded tests or papers may be handed back to be reviewed or passed to the front of the teacher has instituted a procedure where the grade is not visible, such as folding the paper in half with the name on the back half of the paper, having the paper upside down, assigning a random number to each student or putting the grade on the last page of any assignment. No open grade books that display other students’ class if the grades will be shared.

Posting or Assisting with Graded Papers

Do's Don'ts
Students may assist with distributing graded papers or placing papers in mailboxes if the grades are not visible. Students may not assist with distributing graded papers or placing papers in mailboxes if student grades are visible.
Individual incentive charts that compare progress, kept by students, are considered acceptable practice. Incentive charts that compare student progress by name may not be posted or displayed.
Posting grades of any kind may be used if random, anonymous numbers are assigned to identify students. Posting of grades of any kind with a student’s name or District student ID number may not be used.
Do's Don'ts
High school student helpers assisting at the elementary or middle level may grade assignments, record grades and distribute papers in the elementary or middle school classroom to which they are assigned. Under no circumstances may high school students assist with grading, recording grades or distributing graded papers at the high school level.
College practicum students and student teachers may assist with grading, evaluating work, recording grades and distributing student assignments.  
Student work may be displayed if grades are not visible.  

Parent/Guardian Assistance
If a school chooses to involve parents/guardians in grading or recording situations, a parent/guardian sign-off must be completed for each student in the program. Signed permission forms would be completed and kept on file by building administration. If a sign-off form is not on file for all students in the program, the following guidelines apply:

Do's Don'ts
Parents/guardians may assist with distributing work or placing it in mailboxes if grades are not visible. Parents/guardians may not assist with distributing graded work or placing it in mailboxes if student grades are visible.
  Parent/guardian volunteers may not record grades or evaluate data on individual students.

 

Regulation   Board Action
New: 03-24-97 28742
Revised: 02-08-99 29263
Revised: 05-24-01 29867
Revised: 11-08-04 33960
Revised: 11-14-05 34260
Revised: 09-24-07 34847
Revised: 10-12-09 35520
Revised: 08-09-10 35791
Revised: 08-12-13 36694
feedback